Tautai

Tautai

https://tautai.org/saltwater-interconnectivity/

Exhibition: SALTWATER / Interconnectivity

Read more

Tui and Sulieti discuss the effects of the global pandemic and the importance of family which are the central themes in their show, Voyagers: The Niu World

Read more

Voyagers: The Niu World. OPENING FRIDAY 19th MARCH, 6PM

Read more

TUI EMMA GILLIES – Change of alert levels affects exhibition at Tautai Gallery

Read more

The timing is certainly not great – and definitely a little ironic – for Tautai Contemporary Pacific Arts Trust’s next exhibition, Voyagers: The Niu World by New Zealand-based, Tongan mother-daughter combo Tui Emma Gillies and Sulieti Fieme’a Burrows.

Read more

Voyagers: The Niu World showcases a collection of tapa artworks by award-winning Tongan artists Sulieti Fieme’a Burrows and her daughter Tui Emma Gillies. Their collection was created during and after lockdown and reflects on the idea of navigating a changed world in the midst of a pandemic.

Read more

Sulieti and Tui chat to Lynn Freeman about the Coronavirus era and the way in which the word “bubble” has come to mean safety and sanctuary. But can bubbles also be cages, forcing families apart?

Read more

Mother-daughter team to open Pacific art gallery with lockdown journey on tapa art

Read more

SALTWATER / Interconnectivity artist Peter Elavera speaks to his work Unity Wall which highlights West Papua’s struggle for freedom and self-determination

Read more

Throwback to our Artist Talk with some of the artists and curators of our current SALTWATER / Interconnectivity exhibition.

Read more

We had such an incredible night celebrating and hosting our community at the opening of the MOANA WALL! A collaboration between Tautai and Link Alliance. https://youtu.be/wCRbMgHAINs Check out the incredible work of Natasha Ratuva and Hōhua Kurene, on show ...

We had such an incredible night celebrating and hosting our community at the opening of the MOANA WALL! A collaboration between ...

Read more

Photo Gallery: Moana Wall

Ni sa bula!  On behalf of Tautai we want to thank you all for making the opening of the MOANA WALL such an incredible experience and special occasion!

Read more

Meet the Artist: Natasha Ratuva

Raised in Fiji, multi-media creative Natasha is one of the two artists behind Tautai x Link Alliance’s MOANA WALL

Read more

Meet the Artist: Hōhua Ropate Kurene

Pōneke born photographer and multi-media artist Hōhua, is one of two creatives behind Tautai x Link Alliance’s project the MOANA WALL

Read more

SALTWATER / Interconnectivity artist Shawnee Tekii describes the political element of her practice and how participation activates her work

Read more

Tautai Contemporary Pacific Arts Trust and Link Alliance are proud to present the MOANA WALL.

Read more

SALTWATER / Interconnectivity artist and curator Katharine Losi Atafu-Mayo gives us an insight into her work, which presents the moana as a site of connection.

Read more

SALTWATER / Interconnectivity artist Te Ara Minhinnick shares how her work helps her to learn more about her whakapapa and her whenua

Read more

SALTWATER / Interconnectivity artist Telly Tuita talks about the pride of seeing Pacific arts and artists flourishing in Aotearoa.

Read more

Highlights from our SALTWATER / Interconnectivity opening held on Thursday 15 October at TAUTAI Gallery with our beautiful arts community and family!

Read more

Fakaue lahi to everyone who came through to support, witness and celebrate an incredible exhibition SALTWATER / Interconnectivity. Check out photo’s from the opening here!

 

Read more

Meet the Curators: Introducing the co-curators of our current exhibition, Katharine Losi Atafu-Mayo and Giles Peterson!

Read more

Performances: For Artweek 2020 Tautai will be showcasing three performances which highlight the essence of the current exhibition SALTWATER/Interconnectivity.

Read more

SALTWATER/Interconnectivity: First Nations digital artist and filmmaker Gutiŋarra was born deaf, his art represents a powerful and positive message of living with disability.

Read more

SALTWATER/Interconnectivity: The work of Te Ara Minhinnick centres around the alliances of people, space, and  place, stemming from her Ipu Karea – the ancestral homelands of her Iwi, Ngāti Te Ata.

Read more

SALTWATER/Interconnectivity: Shawnee Tekii uses art as a tool to create social engagement. Often tackling the political issues that surround the community.

Read more

SALTWATER/Interconnectivity: Peter Elavera’s style of work is a fusion of pop art, street graffiti art, elements and principles of graphic design, symbolism, patterns and fine arts.

Read more

SALTWATER/Interconnectivity: Samoan artist Katharine Losi is drawn to practices centred around healing and ritual, promoting the use of indigenous and creative methodologies.

Read more

SALTWATER/Interconnectivity: A Tongan multi-disciplinary artist never afraid to experiment and develop his practice, beautifully combining tradition with the contemporary.

Read more

Cora-Allan Wickliffe talks about the revival of Niuean hiapo is a tradition that will be passed onto her children and the next generations to come.

Read more

Mereani Qalovakawasa connects with us from Melbourne during this time of uncertainty and disruption, which is the everyday reality for many people living with chronic illnesses or disabilities.

Read more

Israel Randell explains the concept behind her mahi and how it encourages the viewer to look into their past.

Read more

Ahsin Ahsin talks about reconnecting with his fellow artists and what people might take away from his work and the exhibition.

Read more

Rangituhia Hollis reflects on the lockdown as a catalyst for making and what it means to be part of the show.

Read more

From kete and hiapo to MS Paint and neo-pop crocodiles, Tautai Gallery celebrates Pacific art in all its forms. – The Spinoff

Read more

Tautai Director Courtney Sina Meredith waxes lyrical about our niu era

Read more

Moana Legacy: Ahsin Ahsin distills his imagination into his vibrant mural sized designs and multi-disciplinary practice

Read more

Talia Smith | Moana Legacy

Moana Legacy: Artist, writer, and curator Talia Smith illustrates the vā through her photographic-based practice

Read more

Israel Randell | Moana Legacy

Moana Legacy: Israel Randell’s creates spatial activations where one can experience Matauranga Māori

Read more

Moana Legacy: Māori textile artist Gina Ropiha works primarily with found objects to convey her experience of indigneity

Read more

Naawie Tutugoro | Moana Legacy

Moana Legacy: Waiheke-based artist Naawie Tutugoro uses pop-culture influences from childhood in her multi-media work

Read more

Moana Legacy: Using unconventional methods of digital media, Rangi exhibits video and print works which are interactive and contemplative

Read more

Moana Legacy: Mereani Qalovakawasa explores the complexities of living with Lupus and being a Pacific Islander

Read more

Cora-Allan Wickliffe & Kelly Lafaiki | Moana Legacy

Moana Legacy: Sisters Cora-Allan and Kelly feature objects of memory that connect them to their grandfather

Read more

Moana Legacy

Exhibition: Moana Legacy

Read more

Artists Spotlight: Tui Emma Gillies & Sulieti Fieme’a Burrows

Mother-daughter duo Sulieti Fieme’a Burrows and Tui Emma Gillies, creators of Voyagers – The Niu World exhibition explain what inspires their unique tapa art. They discuss the effects of the global pandemic and the importance of family which are the central themes in their show.


“We’re voyaging through this pandemic and if we look back at our ancestors, they just jumped on these big vakas and they took off to destinations around the world that they had no idea what it’s going to be like. And so, for me I was looking at the pandemic and just thought wow, we’re like them.”

Tui Emma Gillies

Voyagers: The Niu World is on at Tautai Gallery till May 22


For further information please email us
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

EXHIBITION – Voyagers: The Niu World

Voyagers Opening

Si’oto’ofa! Tautai is proud to announce it’s first exhibition of 2021.

<< Voyagers: The Niu World >>
Created by Sulieti Fieme’a Burrows

and Tui Emma Gillies

Following the announcement that Auckland will be moving to Alert Level 1, we are happy reschedule the opening for VOYAGERS – The Niu World to Friday 19 March .

Combining pieces created during Aotearoa’s lockdown and new work, this exhibition aims to tap into the spirit of the great explorers of the Pacific, consulting the stars and charting a course into the wild blue expanse.


“The waves have never been bigger or more threatening, the storms have never been so savage, the fires have never been so close and hot. And we are expressing this in the medium we were brought up in, tapa painting, which has been passed down from generation to generation by those people who made the original voyages and their ancestors before them. This exhibition is dedicated to all us Voyagers navigating The Niu World.”

– Tui Emma Gillies & Sulieti Fieme’a Burrows

We are honoured to be working with these talented women and we look forward to sharing their work with you all.
The Artists, Tui Emma Gillies & Sulieti Fieme’a Burrows

Voyagers: The Niu World
20 March – 22 May 2021
Tautai Gallery, Level 1 – 300 Karangahape Road, Auckland Central

For further information please email us 
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Voyagers x 531PI

TUI EMMA GILLIES – Change of alert levels affects exhibition at Tautai Gallery

Voyagers x 531PI
Tui Emma Gilles exclusive interview on 531PI

Eteuati Eteuati talks with Tui Emma Gillies about how the latest Covid19 alert level changes has affected her and her mothers exhibition which was to open in Auckland’s Tautai gallery tomorrow night, Friday 19 February 2021


Listen to the full interview here

For further information please email us
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Voyagers x The Big Idea

What Latest COVID Level Changes Mean to the Arts

Voyagers x The Big Idea
Tui Emma Gillies and Sulieti Fieme’a Burrows

In light of Auckland’s level 3 lockdown from February 14 2021, a number of art shows and festivals are coming to a grinding halt once again.

The timing is certainly not great – and definitely a little ironic – for Tautai Contemporary Pacific Arts Trust’s next exhibition, Voyagers: The Niu World by New Zealand-based, Tongan mother-daughter combo Tui Emma Gillies and Sulieti Fieme’a Burrows. 

The Big Idea

Read the full article here

For further information please email us
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Voyagers x PMN News

Tongan artists’ exhibition navigates the ‘Niu’ world on tapa

Voyagers x PMN News
Sulieti Fieme’a Burrows & Tui Emma Gillies, Voyagers 2020

Voyagers: The Niu World showcases a collection of tapa artworks by award-winning Tongan artists Sulieti Fieme’a Burrows and her daughter Tui Emma Gillies. 
Their collection was created during and after lockdown and reflects on the idea of navigating a changed world in the midst of a pandemic.


“We’re all voyaging at the moment through rough waters because we don’t know what our destination is going to be at the end of it,”

Tui Emma Gillies

Read the full article here

For further information please email us
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Voyagers x RNZ

Tongan tapa-making in a lockdown bubble

Voyagers x RNZ
Sulieti Fieme’a Burrows & Tui Emma Gillies, Fāmili 2020

Sulieti and Tui chat to Lynn Freeman about the Coronavirus era and the way in which the word “bubble”  has come to mean safety and sanctuary.  But can bubbles also be cages, forcing families apart?
This is one of the ideas explored by mother and daughter, New Zealand-based Tongan ngatu or tapa artists.


Listen to the full interview here

For further information please email us
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Voyagers x Stuff

Mother-daughter team to open Pacific art gallery with lockdown journey on tapa art 

Tautai x Stuff
Sulieti Fieme’a Burrows and her daughter Tui Emma Gillies’s Voyagers: The Niu World will be exhibited at the Tautai Pacific Art Gallery at Karangahape Rd in Auckland’s CBD

Sulieti and Tui sit down with Stuff’s Auckland Pasifika Affairs Reporter Torika Tokalau to share some insight into their upcoming exhibiton, Voyagers – The Niu World opening at Tautai Gallery soon!


“So to have it away from that traditional setting but still including it, and having it in a contemporary space – this is from the islands, from our ancestors – it’s saying that we belong up there too.

Tui Emma Gillies

Read the full story here

For further information please email us
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Artist Spotlight: Peter Elavera

SALTWATER / Interconnectivity artist Peter Elavera speaks to his work Unity Wall which highlights West Papua’s struggle for freedom and self-determination, sharing the message that “West Papua’s freedom is will be Pacific’s freedom”.

On December 1st, Tautai hosted a solidarity event ‘One Solwara, One Love’, to commemorate what should be West Papuan Independence Day. As part of the event, Peter shared his message of solidarity with his West Papuan brothers and sisters.

Video by No Six.


SALTWATER / Interconnectivity is on at Tautai Gallery till 30 January, 2021


For further information please email us
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

SALTWATER / Interconnectivity: Artist Talk

Throwback to our Artist Talk with some of the artists and curators of our current SALTWATER / Interconnectivity exhibition.

Malo lahi ‘aupito and nga mihi nui to everyone who came along, Tenkyu to our curators Giles Peterson and Katharine Losi Atafu-Mayo and amazing artists Telly Tuita, Te Ara Minhinnick and Katharine for sharing with time and space with us.


SALTWATER / Interconnectivity is on at Tautai Gallery till 30 January, 2021


For further information please email us 
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Moana Wall Opening Highlight Reel

We had such an incredible night celebrating and hosting our community at the opening of the MOANA WALL!

A collaboration between Tautai and Link Alliance.


Check out the incredible work of Natasha Ratuva and Hōhua Kurene, on show now!
Inside the wave are ocean bodies| Dec 2020 – Apr 2021



“WELCOME TO THE FUTURE – you have finally arrived where we have always been – and it is breathtakingly beautiful.”

– Courtney Sina Meredith



Moana Wall curated by Cora-Allan Wickliffe
Video by No Six

For further information please email us.
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Photo Gallery: Moana Wall

Ni sa bula!  On behalf of Tautai we want to thank you all for making the opening of the MOANA WALL such an incredible experience and special occasion! 

Check out the photo gallery’s below!

Fa’afetai lava to our matua Rev. Mua Strickson-Pua. Thank you for your continuous support and blessing us with your spiritual guidance.  Fakafetai to our brilliant MC Daedae who commanded the stage with so much poise and grace and all of our speakers!

We’d like to acknowledge our amazing SALTWATER / Interconnectivity artists Te Ara and Telly and curators Kat & Giles who joined the celebrations and came to support after their artist talk at Tautai Gallery.

Fakaue lahi to our spectacular artists Natasha & Hōhua and curator Cora-Allan for creating the very first exhibition for the Moana Wall – ‘Inside the wave are ocean bodies’. The calibre of work you have created transcends time, worlds and oceans and we’re so happy to be part of your journey in this special project!  

Malo ‘aupito to our incredible performers – Samara Alofa, Church & AP and DJ Al’goodie on the decks! Each of you created the most epic vibe and the kept everyone in the highest spirits on Friday night! 

Meitaki ma’ata to our amazing caterers – Fob BBQ, Boil-up Crew, Ika Bowl and Blue Rose! The Pasifika & Māori cuisine was undeniably a highlight of the night! Thank you for filling our bellies with that soul food! 

We are so grateful to our friends, family and community that showed up to support and look forward to making more memories together on the Tautai vaka!  

Finally, thank you to the Link Alliance team and the beautiful partnership we have created from 2020-2023 to highlight the excellence of our Moana artists and share our culture on a public platform in the heart of Auckland City!  

All Photos by Isoa Kavakimotu


Inside the wave are ocean bodies is featuring on the Moana Wall until April 2021


For further information please email us
Tautai.org  #tautai4lyfe

Meet the Artist: Natasha Ratuva

Natasha Ratuva

Raised in Fiji, multi-media creative Natasha is one of the two artists behind Tautai x Link Alliance’s MOANA WALL

Titled Inside The Wave Are Ocean Bodies will be the first mural displayed on the Moana Wall by Hōhua Ropate Kurene and Natasha Ratuva. Curated by Cora-Allan Wickliffe, this piece will be able to be viewed from the East St Hoardings from
4 December 2020 – April 2021

MOANA WALL | NATASHA RATUVA
Photograph by Hōhua Ropate Kurene, 2020

Ni sa bula vinaka, Natasha Ratuva (her/she) is an Indigenous digital artist and creative from Naioti, Kadavu and Bua on her maternal side. She was born and raised in Fiji and came to Tāmaki in 2012. Natasha is honoured to work in Aotearoa and celebrates her ancient ties to tangata whenua as Moana peoples. Creating as an unconquerable sum of both beautiful lineages, she is eternally grateful for her place amongst her ancestors past, present and future that are constantly referred to in her creative work. Natasha gives a special vinaka vakalevu to her parents and brothers Joji and Jone, who she learns from everyday and together share in the feast of their ancestral knowledge.

Natasha Online:
Instagram: dotnut2014

More Information:
MOANA WALL, 4 December 2020 – April 2021

For further information please email us.
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Meet the Artist: Hōhua Ropate Kurene

Hōhua Ropate Kurene

Pōneke born photographer and multi-media artist Hōhua, is one of two creatives behind Tautai x Link Alliance’s project the
MOANA WALL

Titled Inside The Wave Are Ocean Bodies will be the first mural displayed on the Moana Wall by Hōhua Ropate Kurene and Natasha Ratuva. Curated by Cora-Allan Wickliffe, this piece will be able to be viewed from the East St Hoardings from
4 December 2020 – April 2021

MOANA WALL | Hohua Kurene
Photograph by Hohua Kurene, 2020

Talofa Lava, Hōhua Ropate Kurene (he/him) is a queer Indigenous artist specialising in photography, multimedia design & creative writing. He is of mixed Samoan, Māori & Afro-European heritage. Originally born in Porirua, Hōhua was raised in his Father’s village Luatuanu’u Samoa, and later in his Mother’s birthplace Ōtautahi, Aotearoa. Hōhua currently calls Tāmaki Makaurau his home under the guidance of his Arts Aiga the Fafswag Arts Collective and wider Tāmaki Whanau. 

Hōhua Online:
Instagram: hohua

More Information:
MOANA WALL, 4 December 2020 – April 2021

For further information please email us.
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Artist Spotlight: Shawnee Teki

SALTWATER / Interconnectivity artist Shawnee Tekii describes the political element of her practice and how participation activates her work.

“…I like to think of myself as that middleman, messenger, just trying to get stories out to the public.”

– Shawnee Tekii

SALTWATER / Interconnectivity is on at Tautai Gallery till 30 January, 2021


For further information please email us
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Exhibition: Moana Wall

MOANA WALL

Tautai Contemporary Pacific Arts Trust and Link Alliance are proud to present the MOANA WALL.

An outdoor exhibition space located on East Street’s hoardings surrounding the Karangahape Station construction site. Tautai will curate and project manage the outdoor exhibitions from 2020 – 2023. The 70m hoardings will be transformed into the MOANA WALL using the existing infrastructure as a canvas that highlights contemporary Pasifika artists and celebrates the diverse community of Karangahape Road.

The MOANA WALL aims to highlight a significant era of Karangahape Road’s history and its lasting connection to Pasifika communities today.

The grand opening will be held on Friday 4 December celebrating its first exhibition Inside the wave are ocean bodies by artists Natasha Ratuva and Hōhua Ropate Kurene, curated by Cora-Allan Wickliffe. The exhibition will remain until April 2021.

‘This new site specific work is an exploration of the crucial mechanisms that inform our connections as Moana communities. Through photographic, digital media and poetry Hōhua and Natasha created a narrative that celebrates the connections of their Fiji, Samoan and Māori whakapapa.’

On Friday 4 December we will reveal the MOANA WALL to the public for the first time, followed by an evening of outdoor festivities on East Street which includes food stalls, live performances and more!

For further information please email us.
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Artist Spotlight: Katharine Losi Atafu-Mayo

SALTWATER / Interconnectivity artist and curator Katharine Losi Atafu-Mayo gives us an insight into her work, which presents the moana as a site of connection.

“I want people to exchange with the moana….”

Katharine Losi Atafu-Mayo

SALTWATER / Interconnectivity is on at Tautai Gallery till 30 January, 2021


<< Stay tuned for more Artists Spotlights from SALTWATER / Interconnectivity >>

For further information please email us
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Artist Spotlight: Te Ara Minhinnick

SALTWATER / Interconnectivity artist Te Ara Minhinnick shares how her work helps her to learn more about her whakapapa and her whenua

“If you asked me ‘What are the waterways to you?” I’d answer you and say they’re like the blood of my ancestors.”

– Te Ara Minhinnick

SALTWATER / Interconnectivity is on at Tautai Gallery till 30 January, 2021


<< Stay tuned for more Artists Spotlights from SALTWATER / Interconnectivity >>

For further information please email us
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Artis Spotlight: Telly Tuita

SALTWATER / Interconnectivity artist Telly Tuita talks about where culture is rooted and the pride of seeing Pacific arts and artists flourishing in Aotearoa.

“Memory is such a powerful thing. I could have the sad story of – I was taken away from my culture, I was taken away from Tonga… but I think if culture is strong enough it will never leave you and as you can see, you are the culture.”

– Telly Tuita

SALTWATER / Interconnectivity is on at Tautai Gallery till 30 January, 2021


<< Stay tuned for more Artists Spotlights from SALTWATER / Interconnectivity >>

For further information please email us
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Opening Night: SALTWATER / Interconnectivity

Highlights from our SALTWATER / Interconnectivity opening held on Thursday 15 October at TAUTAI Gallery with our beautiful arts community and family!

Curated by Katharine Losi Atafu-Mayo & Giles Peterson

Featuring: Shawnee Tekii, Peter Elavera, Gutiŋarra Yunupiŋu, Te Ara Minhinnick, Telly Tuita & Katharine Losi Atafu-Mayo

Opening Night Performances by: 4 Thaa Kulture, LALO & Rosanna Raymond

Video by No Six


SALTWATER / Interconnectivity runs until January 30, 2021
Gallery Hours: Mon – Fri, 11am – 4pm


For more information please email us.
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Photo Gallery: SALTWATER / Interconnectivity

Fakaue lahi to everyone who came through on Thursday night to support, witness and celebrate an incredible exhibition!

Check out the photo gallery’s below!

‘SALTWATER / Interconnectivity’ is such a special show and we acknowledge Katharine and Giles for their vision and bringing together this group of talented artists. To Telly, Te Ara, Shawnee, Peter, Kat and Gutiŋarra, we are so honoured to have each of your works in the gallery.

Fa’afetai tele lava to everyone who made Thursday such a special night. A huge shout out to the extraordinary performers – Fili and Noah from 4TK, Ankaramy and the LALO crew and Rosanna Raymond.

Ngā mihi nui ki a koe to the community for coming out and sharing in the celebrations with us, this space is for you and we hope to see you all again soon!

“SALTWATER/Interconnectivity foretells Tautai’s ongoing commitment to artists from Te Moana Nui a Kiwa. Presenting an understanding of reality in the present – within urban and sacred realms: the ever-flowing Moana/Solwara connects us all.”

– Courtney Sina Meredith, Tautai Director


All Photos by Isoa Kavakimotu


SALTWATER / Interconnectivity is on at Tautai Gallery till January 30, 2021
Gallery Hours: 11am – 4pm


For further information please email us
Tautai.org  #tautai4lyfe

SALTWATER/Interconnectivity: Meet the Curators

Meet the Curators

Introducing the co-curators of our current exhibition, Katharine Losi Atafu-Mayo and Giles Peterson!

The pair have transformed the Tautai Gallery to embody the Moana/Solwara worldview with their show SALTWATER/Interconnectivity

Video by NoSix


SALTWATER / Interconnectivity is on at Tautai Gallery until January 30, 2021
Gallery Hours: Mon – Fri, 11am – 4pm


For further information please email us 
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

SALWATER/Interconnectivity: Performances

Performances

For Artweek 2020 Tautai will be showcasing three performances which highlight the essence of the current exhibition SALTWATER/Interconnectivity.

Featuring: Sistar S’pacific aka Rosanna Raymond, 4TK (4 Tha Kulture) and LALO

Artweek | Rosanna Raymond
Rosanna Raymond Photographed by Jermaine Dean

An innovator of the contemporary Pasifika art scene, a long-standing member of the art collective Pacific Sisters, and founding member of the SaVAge K’lub. Raymond’s practice works with people, spaces and things to acti.VA.te a dynamic relationship between them, to realise and reshape the ta-va duality.

Artweek | 4TK
4TK (4 Tha Kulture)

South Auckland based indigenous environmentalist group of youth who are committed to advocating against climate change through the lens that considers minorities.
We rise for and ride out 4 Tha Kulture

Artweek | LALO
LALO

Humiliation in return for Forgiveness.
Accept it or not.
LALO (below) takes you through the Samoan custom ‘Ifoga’. A formal apology where one seeks forgiveness from another by bowing down and humbling themselves. The offender appears covered in an ‘ie toga’ (fine mat). The only way forgiveness is granted is if the victim lifts the ‘ie toga from the offender.

Artweek | Performances
Artweek 2020

More Information:
SALTWATER/Interconnectivity, 15 October 2020 – 30 January 2021

For further information please email us.
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Meet the Artist: Gutiŋarra Yunupiŋu

Gutiŋarra Yunupiŋu

First Nations digital artist and filmmaker Gutiŋarra was born deaf, his art represents a powerful and positive message of living with disability.

Gutiŋarra‘s work is in SALTWATER/Interconnectivity
at Tautai Gallery
15 October 2020 – 30 January 2021

Gutiŋarra Yunupiŋu (b. 1997, lives and works in Yirrkala, NT, Australia) is an Indigenous artist of the Gumatj clan, Yirritja moiety, and Buymarr homeland, working with film and digital media to capture the stories of his kin. Despite being deaf since birth he has managed to overcome many barriers. From 2015 he
has worked at The Mulka Project in Yirrkala, as a Project Officer and filmmaker, often travelling out to Yolŋu homelands where he regularly films cultural ceremonies and events.

SALTWATER/Interconnectivity |  Gutiŋarra Yunupiŋu
Gutiŋarra Yunupiŋu, Gurruṯu’mi Mala (My Connections) – 2019


Gutiŋarra was awarded the 2019 Telstra NATSIAA Multimedia Award for his 6k filmwork Gurruṯu mi’ mala (My Connections) which demonstrates his connections to his people and his country through the Yolŋu kinship-system of gurruṯu. In this
artwork he reveals his position in the world of gurruṯu through his first language, barrkuŋu waŋa (language from a distance) Yolŋu sign language. Gurruṯu’mi mala was also exhibited at AGSA as part of Tarnanthi 2019 and has received great interest due to the fascinating concept underlying this art piece and his history as a film maker and artist. 2019 was an exceptional year for Gutiŋarra as he was also a finalist for the NT Young Australian of the Year Awards.

“Gurruṯu’mi Mala demonstrates my connections to my family, my people and my country through the Yolŋu kinship system of gurruṯu. Gurruṯu not only links me to my clan and my homeland, but to all clans and their homelands. Gurruṯu dictates my connections and relationships to all Yolŋu… past, present and future.”

– Gutiŋarra Yunupiŋu
Gutiŋarra Yunupiŋu Tautai
Gutiŋarra Yunupiŋu

Gutiŋarra Online:
Instagram: The Mulka Project

More Information:
SALTWATER/Interconnectivity, 15 October 2020 – 30 January 2021

For further information please email us.
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Meet the Artist: Te Ara Minhinnick

Te Ara Minhinnick

Multi-disciplinary artist Te Ara draws from her Ipu Karea in her practice, making art using the natural materials from the waterways that surround her home in Waiuku.

Te Ara’s work is in SALTWATER/Interconnectivity
at Tautai Gallery
15 October 2020 – 30 January 2021

Mehemea ka pātai mai koe ki ahau;


“He aha Te Awa o Waikato ki a koe?”


Māku e kī atu, he rite tonu ki te toto o ōku tūpuna.

Te Ara Minhinnick Tautai
Te Ara Minhinnick

The work of Te Ara Minhinnick centres around the alliances of people, space, and  place, stemming from her Ipu Karea – the ancestral homelands of her Iwi, Ngāti Te Ata. Te Ara emphasises a responsibility in this by employing methods of practice  that offer ‘wayfinding’ vessels into the contemporary realities of Mātauranga Māori.  

Te Ara grew up often scolded by her aunties for playing bull rush out the front of  her Marāe in Waiuku. She is a Kohanga and Kura Kaupapa Māori pēpi. Who is now,  currently undertaking a Masters of Fine Arts at Whitecliffe College. Most recently,  Te Ara facilitated a series of wānanga for her first solo show titled TAU (to find grounding) at Audio Foundation. 

SALTWATER/Interconnectivity | Te Ara Minhinnick
Te Ara Minhinnick

Te Ara Online:
Website: tearaminhinnick.com | Instagram: te__ara

More Information:
SALTWATER/Interconnectivity, 15 October 2020 – 30 January 2021

For further information please email us.
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Meet the Artist: Shawnee Tekii

Shawnee Tekii

Interactive, bold and political are just a few of many words one can use to describe Shawnee’s graphic design practice.

Shawnee’s work is in SALTWATER/Interconnectivity
at Tautai Gallery
15 October 2020 – 30 January 2021

SALTWATER/Interconnectivity | Shawnee Tekii
Shawnee Tekii, Goods 4 Sale – 2019

Shawnee Tekii uses art as a tool to create social engagement. Often tackling the political issues that surround the community. The digital age plays a large role in underpinning her practice. Shawnee’s work is often influenced by mainstream media and through the use of bold aesthetics and Instagram worthy graphics, she aims to communicate her political agenda directly to audiences of her generation. Her work encourages the use of mobile phones to either document or activate deeper conceptual content. She often draws inspiration from graphic design in advertising and branding – resulting in bold, attention seeking works.

“The development of social media and data configuration has influenced how we react, think, move and perceive the world.”

Shawnee Tekii
Shawnee Tekii Tautai
Shawnee Tekii

Shawnee Online:
Website: shawneetekii.com | Instagram: shawneetekii

More Information:
SALTWATER/Interconnectivity, 15 October 2020 – 30 January 2021

For further information please email us.
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Meet the Artist: Peter Elavera

Peter Elavera

Social activism and political injustice are central themes in this PNG artist’s mural works.

Peter’s work is in SALTWATER/Interconnectivity
at Tautai Gallery
15 October 2020 – 30 January 2021

Peter Elavera’s style of work is a fusion of pop art, street graffiti art, elements and principles of graphic design, symbolism, patterns and fine arts.

He is currently a leader in modern contemporary urban street art in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea (PNG). His artwork incorporates social activism statements on issues of injustice, inequality and conservation of the natural environment. His interest in harnessing the potency of street art, and enhancing its application started in 2007.

Peter and his ‘Kamilion Art Crew’ – 2019
SALTWATER/Interconnectivity | Peter Elevera
Peter Elavera, Unity Wall – 2018

“UNITY WALL mural art encapsulates the political, economic and social narratives of PNG in its short accounted history”

Peter Elavera

Recently, Peter and his crew, known as the Kamilion Art Krew (KAKS), completed a massive sports stadium wall mural, measuring 769m in circumference in Port Moresby. The sports stadium, known locally as Sir Hubert Murray Stadium, took them 12-months to complete (October of 2018 – October 2019).

Currently Peter and his crew are working on an 800m long sea-wall mural project, in Port Moresby, under the theme, Radioactive Ocean. It brings awareness to conservation of ocean and marine life.

Peter received his art and design mentoring at the Creative Arts Faculty of the University of Papua New Guinea, and graduated in 1996, majoring in Graphic Design.

Peter Elavera Tautai
Peter Elavera

Peter Online:
Facebook: Peter Elavera | Instagram: freewestpapua

More Information:
SALTWATER/Interconnectivity, 15 October 2020 – 30 January 2021

For further information please email us.
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Meet the Artist: Katharine Losi Atafu-Mayo

Katharine Losi Atafu-Mayo

Samoan artist Katharine Losi is drawn to practices centred around healing and ritual, promoting the use of indigenous and creative methodologies.

Katharine Losi’s work is in SALTWATER/Interconnectivity
at Tautai Gallery
15 October 2020 – 30 January 2021

feso’ota’i atu

po, po, po,
manava i totonu; 

may this space light the fire within you that has been extinguished, 
may your peace that’s been disrupted find harmony in all living things, 
may your tino, mafaufau, and agaga feel held, 

I invite you to just be in this space of interconnectedness; 
remember, navigate, reflect, meditate, thank,
manava i totonu; 
exchange your love, your rage, your energy, your joy, your distaste, your healing; 
share what you must with the Moana. 
They will be returned with what you pour into them. 

we are connected, we are profound, we are resilient, we are powerful, 
manava i totonu; 
po, po, po.

Katharine Losi Atafu-Mayo Tautai
Katharine Losi Atafu-Mayo

Katharine Losi is a devoted daughter, sister and godmother with a beautiful vessel that houses her resilient soul, powerful heart and unshakeable spirit…  that’s on PERIYAD! Her social art practice is an evolving ecosystem of Moana healing methodologies, spirituality, community engagement and is grounded in unconditional love. By confronting cultural norms, societal expectations and systematic oppressions; Katharine Losi uses her lived experiences to create an alternative way of operating and living in our everyday. CHE CHE CHEEHOO! 

Katharine Losi Online:
Facebook: Katharine Atafu-Mayo | Instagram: kattymayo

More Information:
SALTWATER/Interconnectivity, 15 October 2020 – 30 January 2021

For further information please email us.
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Meet the Artist: Telly Tuita

Telly Tuita

A Tongan multi-disciplinary artist never afraid to experiment and develop his practice, beautifully combining tradition with the contemporary.

Telly’s work is in SALTWATER/Interconnectivity
at Tautai Gallery
15 October 2020 – 30 January 2021

Telly Tuita was born in Tonga in 1980 and immigrated to Brisbane, Australia in 1989. In 2017, Telly immigrated to Lyall Bay, Wellington, NZ. Telly has a Bachelor of Fine Art from Western Sydney University, a Bachelor of Art Education from the University of New South Wales, and a Masters in Special Education through the University of Sydney. Telly has been and a High School art teacher, a Special education teacher and an Assistant Principal at Green Square School primary school and community centre (2015 – 2017).

Telly Tuita Tautai
Telly Tuita

After working in education Telly returned to art making, full time. Telly Tuita’s art practice encompasses painting, printmaking, sculpture, installation, photo media and performance. He has exhibited in exhibitions in Australia and New Zealand, and has work in the collection of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.  

Telly’s installation titled I LEFT MY HEART IN TONGPOP showcases ten years of a body of work that carries the spirit of Oceania.

“I collect items and iconography that connect with personal narratives and idealised views of places from the past.”

Telly Tuita
Telly Tuita | Interconnectivity
TongPop Wanga 1, 2019 – Digital Print

Telly Online
Instagram: @tellytuita

More Information:
SALTWATER/Interconnectivity, 15 October 2020 – 30 January 2021

For further information please email us.
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Exhibition: SALTWATER/Interconnectivity

SALTWATER / Interconnectivity

Tautai Gallery is transformed to embody the Moana / Solwara worldview

Co-curators Katharine Losi Atafu-Mayo and Giles Peterson have transformed the Tautai Gallery to embody the Moana/Solwara worldview with SALTWATER/Interconnectivity on until January 30, 2021.

Peterson references the late Teresia Teaiwa, ‘she summed it up so well – we sweat and cry salt water, so we know that the ocean is really in our blood – this is the key ingredient for the building blocks of life, it’s also the essence of who we are and captures the incredible journey of navigating the Moana / Solwara.’ Atafu-Mayo and Peterson understand fully the flow of life, the two first meeting as teacher and student. ‘I taught Kat but I find myself learning so much from her, it really has been quite incredible, she’s amazing,’ he says of their collaboration.

The six exhibiting artists are drawn from Aotearoa and across Te Moana Nui a Kiwa; – Peter Elavera, Katharine Losi Atafu-Mayo, Te Ara Minhinnick, Shawnee Tekii, Telly Tuita and Gutiŋarra Yunupiŋu. Their lived experiences magnified through the largeness of the exhibition.

‘We’re using a grand scale to highlight its focus from our incredible artists and that will be apparent to those visiting the show,’ says Peterson and Atafu-Mayo. The curators are excited that the show’s narratives around social justice, equity, gender and sexuality identity, climate change, language diaspora and ancestral knowledge are viewed uniquely through a Moana / Solwara worldview.


SALTWATER / Interconnectivity runs until January 30, 2021
Gallery Hours: Mon – Fri, 11am – 4pm


For further information please email us 
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Artists Spotlight: Cora-Allan Wickliffe

Moana Legacy curator and artist Cora-Allan Wickliffe shares her love for Niuean hiapo and the works she created with her sister Kelly Lafaiki in memory of their beloved late grandfather Vakaafi Lafaiki. The revival of Niuean hiapo is a tradition that will be passed onto her children and the next generations to come.


“It’s energy giving to me! Hiapo is a practise that fills me with energy, and I’m happy when I make it because my son enjoys watching me make my work. If I can have my little one sitting on my lap while I beat (hiapo), it’s a pretty good day!”

– Cora-Allan Wickliffe

Moana Legacy has now ended.


Click here for more Cora-Allan!

For more information please email us
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Artist Spotlight: Mereani Qalovakawasa

Moana Legacy artist Mereani Qalovakawasa connects with us from Melbourne during this time of uncertainty and disruption, which is the everyday reality for many people living with chronic illnesses or disabilities. She hopes people will have an awakening of what’s possible within our community and realise that there are so many stories to tell!

“I share videos that share a bit of insight into my life and what it’s like living with a chronic illness called Lupus… I hope that when people watch it they can understand and also have this feeling of empathy for our situations as well.”

– Mereani Qalovakawasa

Moana Legacy is on at Tautai Gallery till 18 September


<< Stay tuned for more Artists Spotlights from Moana Legacy >>

For further information please email us
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Artist Spotlight: Israel Randell

Moana Legacy artist Israel Randell explains the concept behind her mahi and how it encourages the viewer to look into their past


“There is no shortage of inspiration in Aotearoa…being surrounded by it is quite a fertile space for me.”

– Israel Randell

Moana Legacy has now ended.


Click here for more Israel!

For further information please email us

Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Artist Spotlight: Ahsin Ahsin

Moana Legacy artist Ahsin Ahsin talks about reconnecting with his fellow artists and what people might take away from his work and the exhibition.

“… it’s quite bold, it’s a bit of a statement, it’s in your face…”

– Ahsin Ahsin

Moana Legacy has now ended.


Click here for more Ahsin!

For more information please email us

tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Artist Spotlight: Rangituhia Hollis

Moana Legacy artist Rangituhia Hollis reflects on the lockdown as a catalyst for making and what it means to be part of this show.

“…for a long time we we’ve been pushed apart through western ways of thinking…and made to be separate when there are so many things that connect us.”

– Rangituhia Hollis

Moana Legacy has now ended.


Click here for more Rangi!

For further information please Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Moana Legacy Playlist


For further information please Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

From the moana to K Road

From the moana to K Road: A new Auckland home for artists of the Pacific

From kete and hiapo to MS Paint and neo-pop crocodiles, Tautai Gallery celebrates Pacific art in all its forms.

Written by Gareth Shute for The Spinoff. 7 July 2020

Neo-Pop Artist Ahsin Ahsin in front of his work at Moana Legacy, the opening exhibition of Tautai Gallery (PHOTO: GARETH SHUTE)

After three decades in existence, Tautai Contemporary Pacific Arts Trust has launched its own gallery on Auckland’s Karangahape Road.

The first thing that hits you entering Tautai Gallery’s inaugural exhibition, Moana Legacy, is the range of works on show. On one huge wall is a mural of black humanoid crocodiles on a pink background by neo-pop artist Ahsin Ahsin (Atiu, Aitutaki), while the wall opposite has an illustrated hiapo (Niuean tapa cloth) made using traditional methods by Cora-Allan Wickliffe (Ngāpuhi, Tainui, Alofi and Liku) and her sister Kelly Lafaiki. 

Elsewhere, a specially constructed frame holds ghostly photographs by Talia Smith (Cook Islands, Samoan and New Zealand European) and these sit across hangings of tiny, intricate kete made by Gina Ropiha (Ngāti Kahungunu/Ngāti Kere, Ngāti Raukawa/Ngāti Rakau) from her own hair, while around a corner a dark corridor is filled by an installation of neon blue tubes created by Israel Randell (Tainui, Ngāti Kahungunu).

Jacinda Ardern sepaking at the Opening of Tautai Gallery (PHOTO: GARETH SHUTE)

Tautai founding patron Fatu Feu’u sees this gallery space as the eventual end point of work that he began over 30 years ago. In the 80s, he recalls Colin McCahon saying to him that the New Zealand art world was waiting for Pacific artists to make a serious contribution. The history of progress during the intervening years is evident all around you at Tautai.

Wickliffe’s work is an example of this. She speaks of the influence of legendary NZ Niuean artist John Pule and how their families both came from the same village in Niue. His work proved that the imagery of hiapo had a place in fine art and her work takes the logic one step further – his work was on canvas, while her hiapo are created using traditional materials and patterns. By bringing hiapo out of the museums and into a gallery space, Wickliffe pushes forward the argument for their place in the contemporary artistic conversation. 

Wickliffe took this notion further in her introductory speech for the opening exhibition (which she curated). Pointing to one work, she told the audience it was an unfinished work dedicated to her grandfather who passed away last year. She then proceeded to “complete” the work by painting thick strokes of black paint over the face of the piece, erasing the illustrations and thereby evocatively expressing her loss, while the audience watched on in shocked silence. 

Cora-Allan Wickliffe “Completed” this work at the opening of the exhibition by painting thick strokes of black paint over it (PHOTO: GARETH SHUTE)



Many of the artists on display in the opening exhibition also took part in Tautai’s groundbreaking show in Naarm/Melbourne last year, so the return to Auckland had a sense of homecoming. For Ahsin Ahsin, the trip was his first involvement with Tautai and he found it refreshing to connect with other artists from a Pacific background without any pressure to perform their culture in their art.

“I got to hang out with brown artists, which is quite rare for me. I’m based in Hamilton and there’s not many brown artists in the art community… It’s just about self-expression. I’m from the Pacific so that makes it Pacific art, but I do what I do.”

Ahsin Ahsin



In the future, Ahsin hopes to collaborate with another artist who showed at both exhibitions, Rangituhia Hollis (Ngāti Porou, Ngāti Kahungunu), since they both also create digital work. Hollis’s advanced digital imagery had its own juxtapositions within the current exhibition: firstly with three charcoal/painted works he created to sit alongside them, but also in contrast with the videos created by Brisbane-born Fijian artist Mereani Qalovakawasa, which purposefully use the simplistic software of MS Paint to add a primacy to her work about life with a chronic illness (lupus). 

Hollis was among four artists with Māori heritage in the show (making up half the participants), which reflects Tautai’s recognition of moana nui a kiwa – that all Pacific peoples derive from the same ocean. Hollis says he got a huge amount from being involved in the Tautai exhibition in Naarm/Melbourne, since it also involved trips to local galleries hosted by indigenous curators and opportunities to examine the Pasifika collection at the museums. He is equally impressed by the open, expansive layout of the new gallery:

“I think the utilisation of the space is amazing. I’ve seen it in other forms when it was Artspace and the Film Archive. Artspace had a lot of storage space but this seems to be space for people, not storage for archived items.”

Naawie Tutugoro next to her work, which used bent hair curlers to create a lei (PHOTO: GARETH SHUTE)

Naawie Tutugoro (Kanak and Anglo-Argentinian/European) is one emerging artist involved in Moana Legacy who understands how far Tautai has come to get to this stage. Her father, Luke Tutugoro, was involved with Tautai from its inception and when she was a child he enlisted her to paint the garage of their Grey Lynn villa with nuclear-free messages as part of a Tautai-led campaign. She therefore appreciates the gravity of having her work on display on the opening night.

“It feels like tonight we are planting a tree that is going to be very sacred for the generations to come. I feel very lucky to be opening this space and have work that instigates that.”



– Naawie Tutugoro

Written by Gareth Shute for The Spinoff (source)
Published online on Tuesday July 7, 2020

For further information please email us
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Tautai Director on niu era

“This is our space, this is our time and this is our opportunity.”

– Courtney Sina Meredith


Stay Creative, Stay Connected!

For further information please email us.
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Moana Legacy: Ahsin Ahsin

Meet the Artist: Ahsin Ahsin 

Ahsin distills his imagination into his mural sized designs and multi-disciplinary practice  

Ahsin’s work is in Moana Legacy at Tautai Gallery
6 July – 18 September, 2020

Tāmaki-born Cook Island artist Ahsin Ahsin (Aitu, Aitutaki) distills his imagination into fantastic creatures, sigils, graffiti-marking and gestures suspended in hyperspace. Influenced by sci-fi films, street art and pop culture of the 80s & 90s, Ahsin communicates the notions of neo-pop in his mural sized designs and multi-disciplinary practice. 

Ashin Ashin Tautai
Artist in Naarm, Melbourne 2019

Working between Kirikiriroa (Hamilton, Aotearoa) and Naarm (Melbourne, Australia), Ahsin has exhibited extensively throughout Aotearoa in international shows. Most recently, participating in the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Centre Project – Te Whāinga: A Culture Lab on Civility at Silo Park as well as his exhibition ‘Neon Utopia’ at the Tauranga Art Gallery as part of the international show ‘Mega World’. 

“My contribution to Moana Legacy is a mural of my crocodile characters, that I have been creating for a while now. They stemmed from an interest in ancient Greek/Roman vase paintings.”

– Ahsin Ahsin, 2020

Community, 2019

Ahsin Online
Website: ahsinahsin.com | Instagram: @ushy_ushy

More Information:
Moana Legacy, 6 July – 18 September 2020

For further information please email us.
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Moana Legacy: Talia Smith

Meet the Artist: Talia Smith

Artist, writer, and curator Talia Smith illustrates the vā through her photographic-based practice

Talia’s work is in Moana Legacy at Tautai Gallery
6 July – 18 September, 2020

Living and working on Gadigal & Darug land (Sydney, Australia), Talia Smith is a Taranaki-born artist, writer and curator who explores themes central to her Moana heritage through photographic and moving image mediums. As a second-generation Aotearoa-born indigenous woman, much of her practice explores the investigation of intangible space that those of similar backgrounds can exist and occupy.

Talia Smith Tautai
Surfacing, 2020 | Talia Smith

Talia has been recognised for her curatorial practice by multiple Australian arts institutions including Firstdraft’s emerging curator for 2017 and Artbank’s emerging curator for 2018. As an artist she has exhibited widely in Australia and Aotearoa. In 2020, she is ‘the churchie’ curator for the Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane and has completed the AIR_Frankfurt Program,as curator-in-residence with Basis in Frankfurt, Germany.

Her contribution to Moana Legacy ‘Surfacing’ is a photographic installation based her Masters of Fine Arts research that explores the tenuous link between past, present and future. A stripped back frame adorned with dreamy images from her multiple homelands – her ancestral homeland of the Cook Islands, her current home in Sydney and her birth home Aotearoa.

“Exploring my lived experience of being Cook Island, Sāmoan and New Zealand European, this work looks to explore how the vā can be used as a space for those of a Moana heritage to create their identities outside of Western structures, a place where time is not linear and we are informed by ours and our ancestors experiences.”

– Talia Smith, Moana Legacy Artist

Talia Smith Tautai
Image Courtesy of Artist

Talia Online
Instagram: @edithcollier | Artist’s Website: talia-smith.com

More Information:
Moana Legacy, 6 July – 18 September

For further information please email us.
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Moana Legacy: Israel Randell

Meet the Artist: Israel Randell

An artist creating spatial activations where one can experience Matauranga Māori

Israel’s work is in Moana Legacy at Tautai Gallery
6 July – 18 September, 2020

Israel Randell is a multi-disciplinary artist of Cook Island (Rarotonga) and Māori (Tainui, Ngāti Kahungunu) descent, who explores the notions of innovation as tradition through installations, performances and spatial activations.

Israel Randell Tautai
Artist Israel Randell | Photo by Marijke de Jong

Israel’s work often activates dormant spaces within urban landscapes as a way to expose communities to new ways of thinking. Her practice is underpinned by cosmological theories of space and the parallels found in her Pasifika and Māori culture.

Born in the Waikato region, Israel attended Hungry Creek Art School in Tāmaki Makaurau before moving to Toi Moana (Bay of Plenty) with her young family. Most recently, she was the Supreme Award winner at the 2020 Tauranga Art Gallery, Miles Art Awards.

“Randell works with light and its adversary – dark. Her sculptural light forms create a space where one can experience Matauranga Māori (knowledge)”

Cora-Allan Wickliffe, Curator, Moana Legacy

Israel Randell Tautai
Ake ake ake (whakareretanga), 2020 | Israel Randell

Israel Online
Instagram: @israelrandell |
Podcast: Making Waves Podcast | Postcards Unlocked

More Information:
Moana Legacy, 6 July – 18 September 2020

For further information please email us.
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Moana Legacy: Gina Ropiha

Meet the Artist: Gina Ropiha

A Māori textile artist that works primarily with found objects to convey her experience of indigneity

Gina’s work is in Moana Legacy at Tautai Gallery
6 July 3 – 18 September 2020

Gina Ropiha (Ngāti Kahungunu/Ngāti Kere, Ngāti Raukawa/Ngāti Rakau) is a practising artist who hails from Heretaunga (Hastings) and is based in Naarm (Melbourne, Australia). Working primarily with found and repurposed objects, Ropiha’s art reflects her experience addressing the harsh realities and tests of living as an indigenous woman within colonised lands, while trying to maintain a sense of Māoritanga (Māori culture) and grace.

Gina Rophia Tautai
Artist Gina Ropiha

Rophia has exhibited internationally and was an Artist in Residence at the Australian Tapestry Workshop 2017. She is active member of Motu Taim (formerly Pacific Women’s Weaving Circle) and has been a teacher and tutor in arts education for 19 years.

Featuring works with her actual hair in the exhibition, Gina has gently woven kete as a tribute to Wurundjeri artist Georgia MacGuire. The use of hair was a means of expressing the regret, sorrow and grief felt when witnessing Georgia’s story.

Gina Rophia Tautai
Ka ora ai te iwi (2020) | Gina Rophia

Gina Online:
Instagram: @ginaropiha

More Information
Moana Legacy, 6 July – 18 September 2020

For further information please email us
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Moana Legacy: Naawie Tutugoro

Meet the Artist: Naawie Tutugoro

Creating site-specific works that illuminate negotiations of place and space specific to the urban Pasifika experience.

Naawie’s work is in Moana Legacy at Tautai Gallery
6 July – 18 September, 2020

Naawie Tutugoro
Artist at Blak Dot Gallery in Naarm, Melbourne 2019

Born to a Kanak father and Anglo-Argentinian/European mother, Naawie Tutugoro is a Tāmaki Makaurau-born multi-disciplinary artist. Her practice comprises of site-specific works that illuminate negotiations of place and space specific to the urban Pasifika experience.

Tutugoro is currently living on Waiheke island, and has exhibited throughout Tāmaki Makaurau. Most recently, she collaborated with her friend and sculptor Jenny Takahasi Palmer on the exhibition ‘*subtleRESPECT’ at Window Gallery and is currently completing her Master of Fine Arts at ELAM.

“Hair discrimination and invisibility has been something I have become aware of growing up with afro hair.”

– Naawie Tutugoro, 2020

Growing up, especially as women, we are bombarded with contradicting desires and messages regarding beauty standards and self-acceptance. The idea of taming one’s hair is assimilation in practice, altering oneself to fit into the mould of what is considered acceptable.

“Bendy Rollers”, are a product used to alter the texture/style or hair speaking to ideas of cultural appropriation and fetishisation of black and brown bodies. By re-purposing the curlers as connections of a lei, Naawie dismantles the meanings attached to the material and in a decolonising act, the lei of hair curlers is transformed into an imagined umbilical cord to the spirit world.

Naawie Tutugoto
Naawie’s installation at Blak Dot Gallery in Naarm, Melbourne

Naawie Online
Instagram: @astonishing_coco_puff

More Information:
Moana Legacy, 6 July – 18 September 2020

For further information please email us
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Moana Legacy: Rangituhia Hollis

Meet the Artist: Rangituhia Hollis

Using unconventional methods of digital media, Rangi exhibits video and print works which are interactive and contemplative

Rangi’s work is in Moana Legacy at Tautai Gallery
6 July – 18 September, 2020

Rangitihua Hollis Tautai
Rangitihua Hollis. Across the Face of the Moon. 2019

“…Maybe in a few million years I’ll still be here to hear that star answer back. Somewhere still standing with you, still there above and roaring, well above, at the apex of all things, seeing our flaming sun dim above a dying world…”

– Excerpt from Across the Face of the Moon (2019)



Rangituhia Hollis (Ngāti Porou, Ngāti Kahungunu) is an artist, writer and educator. His practice employs a range of collaborative strategies, often resulting in large-scale digital animation video works or interactive social engagement projects that explore Aotearoa’s postcolonial context. He often develops work using emerging or unconventional technologies. He has exhibited throughout Aotearoa in leading public museums and galleries.

Rangituhia Hollis Tautai
Artist Rangituhia Hollis

Rangi Online
Artists Website: rangituhia.com | Instagram: @rangituhia

More Information:
Moana Legacy, 6 July – 18 September 2020

For further information please email us
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Moana Legacy: Mereani Qalovakawasa

Meet the Artist: Mereani Qalovakawasa

Mereani explores the complexities of living with Lupus and being a Pacific Islander

Mereani’s work is in Moana Legacy at Tautai Gallery
6 July – 18 September, 2020

Mereani Qalovakawasa Tautai 2019
Artists Talk at Blak Dot Gallery, Naarm as part of exhibition ‘the spACE betWEen us’, 2019.


Brisbane-born Fijian artist Mereani Qalovakawasa uses her multidisciplinary practice to shed light on living with a chronic illness. Sharing her personal experiences living with the autoimmune disease – lupus, she aims to reduce the fear and shame of being sick, particularly in Pasifika communities.

In 2018, Qalovakawasa participated in her first exhibition with New Wayfinders called ‘Ocean Stories From Home’ at Connection Art Space, this will be her first time exhibiting in Aotearoa. 

Mereani’s illness and the experiences it brings to her life spark her use of online and computer-based media works. Filming on an old Big W camera, drawing using MS Paint and editing on MovieMaker, she depicts her own legacy through sharing the timeline of her health. These small clips give an intimate part of her journey through chemo and the battles she faces daily.

Pacific people are often depicted as the image of vibrant health and beauty, physically strong and joyful, glowing brown skin, thick hair, skilled athletes and graceful dancers, laughing in the hot sun. My life isn’t bad, it’s just different from most people. I try to make life with a chronic illness as pleasant as I can. I find joy in making films to share a glimpse of my life.”

– Mereani Qalovakawasa, 2020

Mereani Qalovakawasa Tautai
Mereani Qalovakawasa, ‘Sick of It’ (2019). Installation View.


Mereani Online:
Instagram: @mereanitarau | YouTube: Mereani Qalovakawasa

More Information:
Moana Legacy, 6 July – 18 September 2020


For further information please email us.
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Moana Legacy: Cora-Allan Wickliffe & Kelly Lafaiki

Meet the Artists: Cora-Allan Wickliffe & Kelly Lafaiki

A sister collab that features objects of memory that connect them to their grandfather 

Cora-Allan and Kelly’s work is in Moana Legacy at Tautai Gallery
6 July – 18 September, 2020

Originally from Waitakere, Cora-Allan Wickliffe (Ngāpuhi, Tainui, Alofi and Liku) is a multi-disciplinary artist and curator, who likes to examine and explore representations of Indigenous people through her work. Her sister Kelly Lafaiki, based in Naarm (Melbourne, Australia) is a student of hiapo and has helped to collaborate on the exhibition piece.

Cora-Allan Wickliffe Kelly Lafaiki Tautai
Artists Cora-Allan Wickliffe and Kelly Lafaiki

Exploring themes of ceremony and memory we are re-tracing using silhouetted objects filled with the language of hiapo to share stories of Niue that were passed down at the food table from our grandparents.

Stories of Niue, dances, mena kai and songs were shared throughout our childhood in comfortable and often uncomfortable moments of learning dances and how to cook traditional dishes.

“Our grandparents guided us with stern voices when we were young but grew softer as we all aged. Time spent together over meals and over beers became an environment of admiration and learning.”

Cora-Allan Wickliffe, 2019

These moments would tie them to becoming hiapo makers and this current work explores the moments of mourning they experienced with the passing of their Grandfather Vakaafi Lafaiki in April 2019.

As a contemporary practitioner of hiapo (Niuean barkcloth), Wickliffe has revived a sleeping artform. Her work is very important to her community and has been exhibited in Australia, Aotearoa, England and Niue. Currently, Wickliffe is the curator and exhibitions manager at Corbans Estate Arts Centre.

Cora-Allan Wickliffe & Kelly Lafaiki Tautai
Our Last Supper With You, 2019

Cora-Allan Online
Website: cora-allan.co.nz | Instagram: @coraallan.wickliffe

Kelly Lafaiki Online
Instagram: @dannykelly8567

More Information:
Moana Legacy @ Tautai Gallery, 6 July – 18 September 2020

For further information please email us.
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Exhibition: Moana Legacy

Moana Legacy

Multi-disciplinary show that heralds Tautai’s new space

6th July – 18th September, 2020 
Tautai Gallery  Mon – Fri 11am – 4pm

Moana Legacy is Tautai’s first exhibition in its new gallery space, the show has been developed from an existing partnership with Blak Dot Gallery, Naarm (Melbourne) featuring moana artists working in both Aotearoa and Australia. Continuing the conversation in Tautai’s new expanded space in the heart of Auckland, this show offers up assorted approaches to the idea of legacy.

As artists of the moana, one often looks back to move forward, contemplating the connections to ancestors and finding a place within a narrative that is as deep as the ocean itself. Our ancestors left behind stories of legend with impressive characters, some continue to shape our contemporary stories of today. 

A legacy is the story of someone’s life, it is something that a person leaves behind to be remembered. Legacies are pathways that guide people with their own decision-making – inspiring them to build a legacy of their own.

With this in mind, the artists in this exhibition investigate notions of legacy  and their link to the moana. Featuring photography, installation, video, sculpture, hiapo and painting, Moana Legacy is a celebration of our own legacies and what it means to be an artist of the Pacific

Curated by Cora-Allan Wickliffe, this show features Ahsin Ahsin, Cora-Allan Wickliffe & Kelly Lafaiki, Gina Ropiha, Israel Randell, Mereani Qalovakawasa, Naawie Tutugoro, Rangituhia Hollis and Talia Smith.

Moana Legacy runs from 6 July – 18 September, 2020.


Moana Legacy has now ended.



For further information please email us 
Tautai.org #tautai4lyfe

Subscribe to our newsletter

* indicates required